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4WSFC Latin America and the Caribbean

October 24-27, 2022

Merida, Mexico 

Plenary Sessions
 
Plenary 1: Strengthening COMMUNITIES & VOICES 

October 25, 2022

Organizers:

• Maria Pena, University of West Indies, Barbados, Caribbean

• Eric Wade, Department of Coastal Studies at East Carolina University, Belize

• Alejandro Espinoza-Tenorio, Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR Campeche), Mexico

Speakers:

• Ainka Granderson, Eastern Caribbean

• Emi Koch, Peru

• Vivienne Solis, Costa Rica

• Melina Guadalupe Colorado Dapa, Mexico

• Henry Espinoza Panta, Peru

 

Small-scale fisheries and aquaculture are challenged by diverse and complex issues. These include weak collective action and leadership, poor organizational management, barriers to gender equality and equity, and poor/no social protection. They also face external threats from climate, market dynamics, price fluctuations, new technologies, overexploitation, habitat degradation and more recently, COVID-19. These threats are amplified by pressures from the Blue Economy, coastal development, the international private sector, and little government support. Most challenges require time and perseverance to be solved or managed with support from government policies and administrative and legal institutions, but this can only happen if fishing communities’ voices are heard and prioritized by decision-makers. The plenary will explore the following questions: How are aquatic resource communities articulating their issues and using their voices? How have these voices been heard by the appropriate social, political and economic actors? And Why and where are voices silent or unheard and how can this situation be remedied?

Plenary 2: Strengthening CAPACITY & ASSETS  

October 25, 2022

Organizers:

• Eric Wade, Department of Coastal Studies at East Carolina University, Belize

• Maria Pena, University of West Indies, Barbados, Caribbean

• Alejandro Acosta, Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute

Panel #1: Identifying policy and practice gaps in strengthening capacities and assets of small-scale fishing communities

• Milena Arias-Schreiber, Sweden/Peru

• Mateja Nenadovic, USA

• Neyra Solano, Mexico

• Carlos Villamil, Colombia

 

Panel #2: Institutional responses to strengthening capacities and assets of small-scale fishing communities

• Eduardo Boné Morón, EDF

• Yvette Diei Ouadi, FAO

• Daylin Munoz Nunez, Walton Foundation 

• Peter Murray, CRFM

 

Small-scale fishing communities are undergoing rapid change brought on by coupled social, environmental, economic, and political drivers. In response, communities are racing to adapt to these changes while safeguarding their livelihoods. To adequately respond to these changes, there are increased calls for a re-examination and broader conceptualization of how we define the assets and capacities of communities. In this session, we discuss how the consideration of non-monetary assets such as local and traditional knowledge, social capital, cultural values, peer-to-peer capacity development can strengthen the capacities of communities to adapt to socio-ecological changes. Our speakers will discuss how these non-monetary assets may reinforce their capabilities and how and in what ways they can contribute to a more holistic approach to small-scale fisheries management.

Plenary 3: Strengthening SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL RESILIENCE  

October 26, 2022

Organizers:

• Francisco Arreguín Sanchez, CICIMAR, Mexico

• Alejandro Acosta, Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute

• María José Barragán Paladines, Charles Darwin Foundation, Ecuador

• Edgar Torres-Irineo, Escuela Nacional de Estudios Profesionales-Mérida (ENES-UNAM), Mexico

• Alejandro Espinoza-Tenorio, ECOSUR Campeche, Mexico

Speakers:

• Kendra Karr, USA
• Cesar Viteri Mejia, Ecuador

• Alejandro Espinoza, Mexico

• Adriana Santos, Colombia

• Additional speakers TBC

Socio-ecological resilience is a critical dimension for viability of the small-scale fisheries in LAC. Yet, traditionally, small-scale fisheries have been looked at through the ecological lenses only. We highlight the role social features play within small-scale fisheries capacity to resist to shocks (either anthropogenic or naturally driven) by understanding the timeframe, the scale and the implications of the social elements in how small-scale fisheries are conducted, where, by whom. Additionally, the ecological attribute directly links to how the natural element is perceived, utilized and taken care of (or damaged), by those people who depend upon its health, to survive. In this plenary we will highlight and illustrate the mutual dependency of both sides of this equation for small-scale fisheries in LAC to resist to pressure and to strong changes, under uncertain circumstances. We try to integrate varied perspectives, approaches, end knowledges to articulate both, the social-and-ecological as one unified segment where to set the small-scale fisheries in order to address the challenges they face.

Plenary 4: Strengthening SOCIO-ECONOMIC VIABILITY   

October 26, 2022

Organizers:

• Edgar Torres-Irineo, Escuela Nacional de Estudios Profesionales-Mérida (ENES-UNAM), Mexico

• Sergio Macedo Gomes de Mattos, Instituto Maramar, Brazil

• María José Barragán Paladines, Charles Darwin Foundation, Ecuador

Speakers

• Lina Saavedra Diaz, Colombia

• Juan Carlos Seijo, Mexico

• Daniela Kalikoski, Rome

Panel

•  Fishers from Panama, Peru, Chile and the Caribbean

The COVID19 pandemic taught us, human beings how closely connected the social and economic features of the world system, are. The viability of the small-scale fisheries during the pre- and the post-pandemic time have been in question, within the uncertain scenario we currently have. We will explore how, this already vulnerable sector, could become more resilient and viable under the great number of challenges, at national and global scale, that greatly affect the economic realities fishers live with. This plenary will present some reflections and ideas for this sector to adapt to the large and small-changes the world is exposed to, and that could help the small-scale fisheries sector to explore, find, negotiate and appropriate strategies to be viable in the context of LAC.

Plenary 5: Strengthening VALUE CHAIN       

October 27, 2022

Organizers:

• Silvia Salas, CINVESTAV del IPN-Mérida, Mexico

• Sergio Macedo Gomes de Mattos, Instituto Maramar, Brazil

• Francisco Arreguín Sanchez, CICIMAR, Mexico

• Eva Coronado, ENES-UNAM, Mexico

Speakers - Academia & Organizations:

• Sarah de Oliveira, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Brazil

• Tania Mendo, University of St. Andrews, Peru

• Eva Coronada, ENES-UNAM, Mexico

• Jorge  Ramírez-González, Charles Darwin Foundation, Ecuador  

Discussant: Silvia Salas

Speakers - Fisheries and Aquaculture sector:

• Zoila Bustamante, Confederación nacional de pescadores artesanales de Chile, Chile 

• Carlos Chapilliquen, Caleta de Cabo Blanco, Peru

• Rudy Abad, CANAIPESCA, Mexico

• Jorge Tordecillas, Centro ostrícola tecnológico del estado de Tabasco, Mexico

• Citlalli Gómez Lepe, Consejo Mexicano de promoción de los productos pesqueros y acuícolas,  Mexico

Discussant: Silvia Salas

Fishery products are among the most traded food worldwide commodities and its demand keep on growing as they integrate into the global economy. Overall, developing countries export close to 50% of total export value; and small-scale fisheries (SSF) play an important role in this trade. However, the global trade not always can ensure food security of those countries and fishing communities, and the economic benefits are not necessarily balanced across value chains or among countries that trade regularly. Economically, small-scale artisanal fisheries often face power imbalances in value chains, unnecessary barriers to trade, and a lack of the appropriate skills and services to access markets with healthy products at a fair price. Recognizing SSF as an essential player in the value chain and the need to face challenges in the governance of these value chains are essential. It is necessary to ensure strengthen the existing capacity and networks to generate resilient and viable communities that can enhance sustainability in fisheries and their governance, social development, and well-being. Key questions to be addressed are how to generate resilient and viable communities to enhance SSF’s value chain sustainability and their governance, and main challenges in trading processes and how to face them.

Plenary 6: Strengthening TRANSDISCIPLINARY KNOWLEDGE    

October 27, 2022

Organizers:

• Minerva Arce Ibarra, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR Chetumal), Mexico

• Milena Arias Schreiber, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

• Alejandro Acosta, Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute

 

Panel #1: Academia 

• Eric Wade, Belize

• Ana Cinti, Argentina

• Leandro Castello, US/ Chile

• Ana Paula Rainho, Brazil

• Minerva Arce-Ibarra, Mexico

 

Panel #2: Transdisciplinarity in Practice 

• Fisher TBC

• Joanna Alfaro, Peru

• Arturo Milán Alonso, Mexico

• Alexis Nakandakari, Peru

• María José Barragán Paladines, Ecuador

In the last two decades, interest has arisen in applying transdisciplinary approaches in different academic areas and diverse stakeholders’ activities. In artisanal fisheries, this type of approach has been used from at least two main perspectives; the first one uses a conceptual framework from systems thinking and governance theories, and the second one, a framework where epistemologies or the ways in which new knowledge is created are in focus. Considering both perspectives, this session offers a stimulating opportunity to take up the arguments of the Chilean Max-Neef, who postulates that transdisciplinarity is both a tool and a “project under construction”. This plenary presents and discusses transdisciplinary experiences aimed at integrating practitioners, policymakers, and academic and non-academic stakeholders in the process of co-developing and cooperatively producing transformational solutions in small-scale fisheries. It should evaluate how this tool or project can support the solution of big questions surrounding artisanal fisheries in Latin America and the Caribbean related to their viability and sustainability, including the cohesion of fishing communities where fishermen, as a collective, collaborate and become stronger in the face of the many challenges they face.